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Chronic illness: the parts we don't talk about


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Maybe I don’t get to keep this life

So just recently, I made my friend, who just finished her chemo for great cancer, cry.

And for good measure, I made myself cry too.

You see, we are working on a project together about compassion and hugs. Given our respective painful pasts with illness, we think there is too little in the world and we want there to be more.

She couldn’t see how others would relate to her so I told her what I saw (and yes, the tears are coming again).

She had a life, with her family and friends and then cancer came along, threatening it all. Because cancer can kill. We don’t really say that anymore but it’s true.

Death, that constant companion to us all but who we ignore like that really smelly fart in an elevator (we all know it’s there, it’s unpleasant but we all pretend it doesn’t exist).

A cancer diagnosis brings death back into the picture and we realise

Maybe I don’t get to keep this life that I have.

As much as it brings tears to my eyes to type this, and all of a sudden my nose is really snotty, I need to say this

we don’t know what we are going to have tomorrow. And we can’t do anything about the past. We can only change now. So whether you are doing the laundry, paying bills, or are on holiday

Enjoy it!

Find something you like in the activity you are doing, no matter how small, and focus on that. Grow it and enjoy it.


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Where’s the line?

This blog is supposed to be my story: what it’s really like, living with chronic illness.
It’s my view as a “patient” myself and my view as a parent to a chronically ill child.
When I write as a parent, where is the line between my story and Fs story?
When things happen to her, they affect the whole family, they happen to us too.

Yet, they happen to her first.
So am I telling her story or mine?

That’s the question on my mind lately. It’s also why I’ve not been blogging so much lately.
Did I drift away from my story to hers? Admittedly, it is so much easier to talk about her pain than my own. That may sound strange; a mother normally feels the pain of her children keenly. And that’s true: when she hurts, I hurt. But there is nothing more sharp than our own pain.
For while we feel bad when they fall and scape their knees, it is only when we fall and scrape our knees that we realise that it burns like a b*tch.

So where’s the line? Oh yeah, back there. Got it.


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Yay for carrots!

I’m disproportionately excited about carrots.
Why? Because this is the 3rd vegetable that F will eat. It’s taken us 7 & a half years to get here but Yay! (As I write this I had a flash back to 6 years ago and a dietician suggesting I try carrots for F as part of the “she won’t eat anything what should we do” plan.
Well, salt fiend that she is, finally she likes that they are sweet.

So what veggies have we got in the bag?
Green beans
well, mostly the beans inside the pod (she picks them out herself)

Sweetcorn

ah, corn on the cob with lots of salt and butter

Carrots

roasted, of course. The best way to cook carrots.

Coming up next! Butternut Squash

actually she likes this already. She thought the roasted orange delights she liked were carrots. And like the fiend I am, I went along with it. Then one day she caught me out and I thought “oh pants”.

She suprised me. She wanted carrots  so I roasted some. She ate them.

so now no matter what I’m cooking for dinner, if she wants carrots, I put on the oven and roast carrots.

whatever it takes. I want her to eat so badly, I’ll do anything.

well, except when she asks me at 7pm. Then I make her wait until the next day. By the time they would be ready it would be bed time.

Oh, and if we don’t have any carrots in the house, then she’ll have to wait until the next shopping day.

Ok, I won’t do anything so that she will eat. But I do try very hard to have the things she likes to eat in the house. But if we are out, we’re out. Maybe she will try something else.

 

Note: I hate wasting anything so I just have to say: I use the small oven. I wouldn’t turn on the big oven just because she wanted carrots. 

Oh and she eats tomato soup and ketchup (Heinz I love you). But not together, eww.

 

 

 


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I love you, but I don’t always like you

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Parenting is supposed to provide unconditional love: you for your children and from your children to you. And it does.

That’s a parenting truth.

Here’s another parenting truth: your kids won’t like you all the time.

They go through stages where they prefer daddy over mummy, and sometimes, mummy over daddy.

Then they hit puberty and don’t like either of you.

I can see you nodding, Can I get an Amen?

What people don’t talk about is how sometimes you, wonderful parent that you are, don’t like your kids.

So I’ll fess up here and tell you my truth:

Sometimes I don’t like my kids

In fact this last week I have seriously disliked my kids.

  1. Is it because they don’t listen at bedtime and are messing about the whole time?
  2. Is it because they are testing the limits on food requests? Taking advantage of their eating issues to just pick their favourite food?
  3. Is it because I haven’t had enough me time to recharge my batteries?

Yes. Yes to all of them. But mostly it’s No.2

F does have quite major issues with food and it’s still really hard to have food available for her that she will actually eat. I’ve written about it many times and our patience and encouragement is working and she is eating more and more. Did I mention that she ate roasted butternut squash? Voluntarily. And she keeps asking for it. Isn’t that fantastic?

Yes!

Except for when it isn’t. Except for when she can’t face it anymore.

You see, with her condition, her electrolytes can go all over the place, she ends up feeling nauseous and then it becomes hard for her to eat. Her appetite disappears. Food smells and tastes funny to her.

So you never know when she is going to stop eating. Because of her condition.

And then she’s a kid. All kids do their utmost to create the most perfect life for themselves (go kids!).

  • They want to wear their favourite clothes all the time.
  • They only want to eat their favourite food.
  • They want to watch their favourite tv programs.

So, is the sudden difficulty with eating a result of her condition or has she decided she doesn’t fancy it anymore?

Well, I don’t know either. But my gut tells me that she has been playing me lately. Playing me. And I don’t like it.

I got frustrated. It showed. So I told her my suspicion. I asked her outright:

Are you only eating things that you absolutely love and fancy eating?

Yes, she replied.

Mo’fo’!

I’m going nuts trying to feed her. And S? She doesn’t have these issues but she’s a smart girl. She sees the pattern and copies it, uses it to her advantage.

So we had a talk about it. We have called a truce.

But here’s another truth:

The dislike is temporary. The love is permanent.

p.s. her growth has stagnated and her neph says she needs to gain weight. Hmm, I wonder how much this has got to do with my tension? Probably more than it should.

 

This story was also published on Youshare so follow the link and like it there please.


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I don’t know what this means, but I bet you’ve thought it too

On monday night we were all sitting together at the dinner table chatting.

The girls are fascinated by age and love to play this game “when I’m x, how old will you be?”

J went big on this. “When A is 80, F, you will be 74 and S will be 70”. The kids loved it!

I watched their happy faces and tried to imagine them sitting together having fun, at those ripe old ages.

And I could. Except for F. This little thought fluttered through my head so fast that it was almost imperceptible.

“Will F reach 74?”

I didn’t have this thought about the other two.

Now, you never know what the future will bring and I don’t know what it means, that I can picture S and A in their 70s and 80s but draw a blank when it comes to F.

I don’t even want to try and interpret it.

But I just bet that all of you out there, with kids with a chronic illness, will have that same fluttering thought if you play this game.

You might even have that thought about yourself.

Is life just so much closer to the edge when you are sick?


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The Healthy One

It’s a common occurrence that us parents take more photos of our first born than of all our other children combined.

It’s a combination of novelty, the undivided attention they can get and time (you don’t realise what little time you have in a day until you’ve got more than one kid).

I am no different than anyone else in this respect. My little S is growing up so fast and yet so little of her is captured in photographs or films.

We were going to the park the other day and she was running, her arms by her side and her hands flapping back and forth to help propel her forward. Enjoying her enjoyment I thought this would be great to have on film (then you could see just how cute her running style is) but I realised I didn’t have my phone. Yet another moment that will only be stored in my personal (and dodgy) memory bank, that only I can enjoy.

It reminded me of a clip I have of F as we walked to that same park. She pushed her toy buggy with a “sick” baby doll inside. She was the carer, taking this baby out for some fresh air.

I did have my phone with me that day and I have a great short film of it. In fact I have lots of short films of all the cute stuff she did.

Contemplating the difference in me regarding F and S, I have to acknowledge that in the early years with F it wasn’t just the novelty or time, in fact her care took more time than looking after 3 healthy kids. There was also a sense of urgency in me. An imperative to catch her on film because maybe soon that is all I would have left.

Phew, that was hard to say.

It was almost too painful to look upon her directly, without the filter of a camera in between.

I have always been dimly aware that I felt this way. It’s one of the reasons I crashed so hard when she finally started to be well for more than a few days at a time at the age of 3.

So little S I am truly sorry that I do not have more photos and films of you. Please know that I am not taking you for granted because you are healthy and expecting you to always be there. Because the future is not guaranteed and the angels could take you away just as easily.

You see, I am paying more attention to you. I am trying to focus on being with you now, joining in with you, no barriers. I have learnt something from you both about being a mum. When you look at me I want you do see me, not the camera.

I see you and you are great of spirit.

A clever clown who is sweet and kind.

A tough little lady who cries when she falls off the sofa and lands on her head (seriously, how can we stop this happening without tying you down?) Who then, with determination, goes back on that edge, carefully choosing a safe spot this time.

You are vocal about your displeasure (especially at the sofa for not being as wide as you imagined) and you shine brightly and shimmer with joy when you pat your tummy and say Yummy!

I have finally put photos of you up on the wall. It’s something that you have not noticed but has been a weight on my shoulders.

I do see you.

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